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Mending Monday: Favorite Gray Sweater

Today I finally mended the holes in my favorite gray sweater, again. In the fall of 2021 I pulled this very sweater out to wear it for the first time to discover the horror of horrors: moth holes. I’d never had a problem with moths before and we had just moved that January, so I discovered a parting gift from the previous owner–a moth infestation.

After I sorted my stash and checked all of my wool garments, including suits, I bagged everything susceptible to moth damage in zipper-sealed bags. I froze my remaining yarn and fiber for several weeks. I bought some moth defense cleaner and cleaned the built-in closet shelves I had stored my stash on in locking plastic boxes. And I mended the holes in my sweaters and socks.

The mended hole

However, I didn’t put this particular sweater in the freezer in 2021 since I was actively wearing it, which was my mistake, dear reader, because I found four more holes recently and spent part of this afternoon mending them. So this sweater will soon take its place in the freezer on the shelf under the frozen waffles we’ve all forgotten about.

The Yarn Office
The old Yarn Office and my primary yarn storage in the old house

I doubt that I’ll ever store my stash the way I used to in our old house, all loosey-goosey and free flowing in locking (but not air-tight) plastic containers and kind of heaped up in an armoire. All of the yarn and fiber I own, except for the recently acquired alpaca, is stored in an air-tight container or bag now. It doesn’t look very pretty or spark creativity like it used to, but it’s also no longer supporting moth lifecycles.

So here are my tips for staying moth-free:

  1. Put all your yarn and fiber in zipper bags and put new acquisitions in a new bag soon after you bring them home. Why a new bag? Just in case the old bag or existing yarn was somehow contaminated.
  2. Store your stash where it will get light. Moths don’t like light.
  3. Wash it before you put it away for a season, even if you just washed it because you habitually spill coffee on yourself (maybe that’s just me).
  4. Moth traps only indicate activity and are not a means of eradication. Also, moth traps have pheromones to attract moths and that only lasts so long. It’s best to keep tabs on your stash – check it every now and then and make sure it’s still safe.

If you’ve been hit by moths or see evidence of moth activity, don’t ignore the problem and wish it away because it will only get worse. In the summer of 2021 I had noticed moth activity in the Yarn Office, though not in the closet I store my sweaters in, which is several rooms/doors/walls away. I wish I had faced the moth problem then instead of tackling it that winter because it’s one of those problems that’s just going to get worse.


Comments

2 responses to “Mending Monday: Favorite Gray Sweater”

  1. Kathy Reed Avatar
    Kathy Reed

    Aaargh! Moths!!

    1. madgeface Avatar
      madgeface

      Right?! I have everything sealed up tight except what I’m actively working with. BTW, the sweater’s still in the freezer; I keep forgetting to take it out and wash it!

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