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Mending Monday: Green Wood Cardi

In the years since completing the Green Wood Cardigan, it has become a go-to favorite sweater of mine and, like all favorites, it’s gotten a little worn and bedraggled. Let’s back up though. I finished the cardigan at the end of February in 2017 so I should have posts here about it – right? Right?

Unfortunately, no. I have two progress posts, neither of which are worth dredging up. I don’t quite remember what was going on in 2017 other than our 2016-2017 holiday trip was to New Zealand to see Ky’s cousins. And rather than take the Green Wood with me, I started a shawl, the Aranami Shawl by Olga Buraya-Kefelian.

Anyway …

I knit the Green Wood from a kit that I got from Angora Garnet in Sweden. The Green Wood is a Bohus Stickening sweater: “Emma Jacobsson organized Bohus Stickning in 1939 to provide relief work for women in the economically depressed Bohuslan district. Bohus knitting became world famous for producing designs of the highest quality, typically made from angora wool. Jacobsson closed Bohus Stickning in 1969.” (from https://www.angoragarnet.com/en/bohus-stickning/about-bohus-stickning-32248265). Basically, Bohus sweaters represent Swedish women supplementing/supporting their families as well as Swedish couture. These sweaters were very popular in the 40s and 50s. If you’d like to read more about Bohus Stickening, I highly recommend Poems of Color by Wendy Keel and Bohus Stickning – The Revival from the Bohuslans Museum (available in English and worth getting).

The sweater and I have been bonding since I finished it. I wear a lot of colors that are compatible with the greens and blues in this beauty and it had four problem spots that needed to be mended.

I wore this sweater the day we brought Lola home. She later nibbled on the bottom left corner under one of the buttons. This breach grew year by year until I snipped off a 1/2″ section of it, that finger of knitting that held together. To fix the problem, I took the button off and carefully unraveled to a “clean” spot – I pulled out all the ends that were cut until I pulled 2 good rows out, which I reknit and then kept going until the corner was established again.

It’s not perfect, which irritates me a little bit, but it’s definitely functional and it looks good enough.

The next problem was another button band issue, but this time on the other side, where the buttonholes are: it looks like someone (possibly someone who’s name begins with L) took a bite out of the band. As with the bottom left corner, I unraveled and reknit this, grafting the ends in place and fudging connecting the side with a k2tog with the last stitch of the row and an existing stitch in the knitting.

It worked out reasonably well. Again, not perfect but better.

Perfection is difficult to attain but I feel sure I did when I cut the sleeve of this sweater last week while cutting open a new bag of coffee. This cut couldn’t be cleaner or in a better place! I unraveled the sleeve past the cut and reknit it, binding off with a grafting bind off the same way I did originally.

Can you tell which sleeve I reknit? If you can now, I don’t think you’ll be able to after I wash it without looking really really close.

Finally, here’s evidence that I occasionally Hulk out of my sweaters. (Please excuse the hasty unfocused picture. I wore the sweater with this hole for 2 years, so is it any surprise that I couldn’t be bothered to get an in-focus picture?)

Not really. I was sitting on part of it and moving in the opposite direction, possibly tangled in my coat, when this underarm seam ripped. This was a quick and easy fix; I just sewed the seam back up.

Tune in next week (or the week after!) when I conquer some scary moth holes in my go-to gray sweater.


Comments

6 responses to “Mending Monday: Green Wood Cardi”

  1. Your mending looks great. You breathed new life into a classic sweater. Now, about that little nibbler, Lola!

    1. I wish I could attach a pic – she’s too cute to stay mad at for too long.

      1. Oh, my Carver has the biggest brown eyes. When he tilts his head, he is irresistible. Unfortunately, he had a taste for wool as a puppy. Tears were shed.

        1. Yes, we have a critter of that variety also! Rosie recently got ahold of my Alhambra scarf and chomped it. I haven’t repaired it yet, but I did rescue it from the garbage can where it spent the night thinking about its actions and swearing never to jump in the dog’s jaws again. (Ha ha – right! Even Rosie knows she’d do it again if given a chance!)

          1. What is it about wool? Maybe it is the smell of wool and mommy that drives them nuts!

  2. Fantastic repairs! Button bands can be tricky. But I’m especially impressed that you are able to locate the original yarn to repair the sleeve that needed re knitting. ❤️

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